Knights of Columbus Pope John Paul II Council 13808 Greensboro, GA
Knights of ColumbusPope John Paul II Council 13808Greensboro, GA
St. Mary’s student wins first place at Oratorical Finals   (Tue, 21 May 2024)
Eighth-grade student William Jackson, of St. Mary School in Rome, won first place at the annual Oratorical Finals May 1. 
>> Read more

Holy Spirit makes Christians gentle, not ‘overbearing,’ pope says (Tue, 21 May 2024)
Empowered and enlightened by the Holy Spirit, Christians are called to develop the gentleness needed to proclaim the Gospel to all, Pope Francis said on Pentecost Sunday.
>> Read more

Ave Maria! (Tue, 21 May 2024)
I spent the first week of May at the beautiful shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes in France. It was in Lourdes that Our Lady appeared to St. Bernadette Soubirous in 1858. She asked Bernadette to “drink from the fountain and bathe in it.”  
>> Read more

St. Jude students have May Crowning, last for principal Patty Childs  (Tue, 21 May 2024)
St. Jude the Apostle School held its annual May Crowning event on May 1. Students from each grade participated in honoring Mary with flowers and prayer.
>> Read more

Flannery O’Connor’s life and faith serve as inspirations for new film (Tue, 21 May 2024)
A sold-out theater full of Flannery O’Connor fans heard from director/writer Ethan Hawke and actor Maya Hawke about the new biopic “Wildcat.” The film celebrates one of Georgia’s most famous authors.  
>> Read more

Now is time to build new world without inequality, injustice, pope says (Sun, 19 Apr 2020)
By Carol Glatz Catholic News Service ROME (CNS) — As the world slowly recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a risk it will be struck by an even worse virus — that of selfish indifference, Pope Francis said. This … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Puerto Rico: ‘An unprecedented level of need’ (Mon, 06 Nov 2017)
Catholic News Service was the first major Catholic news organization to send a photographer and a reporter to tour the island and document the efforts of the church and other organizations to help many of the people far from the capital of San Juan. Continue reading →
>> Read more

Historic Tomb of Michelangelo and altarpiece in dire need of repairs (Wed, 11 Oct 2017)
By Matthew Fowler ROME (CNS) — The historic tomb of Michelangelo and the Buonarroti family altarpiece in the Church of Santa Croce in Florence are in dire need of cleaning and restoration due to sustained damage over the past 50 … Continue reading →
>> Read more

A look back at the Legion of Decency (Thu, 17 Aug 2017)
By Mark Pattison and Julie Asher WASHINGTON (CNS) — It’s summertime and the movies are plentiful. As everyone knows the summer movie season is a big one for Hollywood, and when it comes to a close, it is followed closely … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Jamboree called ‘life-changing event’ for youths, adults (Fri, 28 Jul 2017)
Here’s a dispatch from Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve in West Virginia sent earlier this week by Msgr. John B. Brady from the national Scout jamboree, which closed today. A retired priest of the Archdiocese of Washington, he became … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Word to Life — Sunday Scripture readings, July 23, 2017 (Fri, 21 Jul 2017)
July 23, Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time       Cycle A. Readings:      1) Wisdom 12:13, 16-19      Psalm 86:5-6, 9-10, 15-16      2) Romans 8:26-27      Gospel: Matthew 13:24-33   By Sharon K. Perkins Catholic News … Continue reading →
>> Read more

John C. Quinn tended to the ‘least of these’ in U.S. newsrooms (Fri, 14 Jul 2017)
WASHINGTON (CNS) – I’m convinced that around the country, and perhaps the world, there are many letters similar to the one I received in the mail some 18 years ago. It was written by hand and it ended with a … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Some cheese with your ‘whine’: Pope ‘establishes’ complaint-free zone (Fri, 14 Jul 2017)
By Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Francis left a not-so-subtle message outside his office in the Domus Sanctae Marthae residence: anyone who is thinking of making a fuss, leave your whining at the door. … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Word to Life — Sunday Scripture readings, July 16, 2017 (Thu, 13 Jul 2017)
  July 16, Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time       Cycle A. Readings:       1) Isaiah 55:10-11       Psalm 65:10-14       2) Romans 8:18-23       Gospel: Matthew 13:1-23   By Jeff Hedglen Catholic News Service It seems as though every time … Continue reading →
>> Read more

Word to Life — Sunday Scripture readings, July 9, 2017 (Fri, 07 Jul 2017)
The Scriptures this weekend contain a familiar, but difficult text. “Take my yoke upon you,” Jesus says. “For my yoke is easy and my burden light.” Continue reading →
>> Read more

Catholic News Agency

Catholic high school decades in the making breaks ground in northern Colorado (Wed, 22 May 2024)
The graduating senior class pioneered St. John Paul II High School in Colorado as freshmen. The 12 students are the first to have gone through all four years of the St. John Paull II program. / Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School CNA Staff, May 22, 2024 / 06:00 am (CNA). After operating out of a parish for four years, a long-anticipated Catholic high school in northern Colorado celebrated graduation on its newly broken ground last weekend. The seniors who pioneered St. John Paul II High School as freshmen studying at Our Lady of the Valley Parish four years ago graduated on the 44 acres that will be home to the school’s future building. These 12 students — the first graduates to have gone through the entire program — joined the founding headmaster, Blaise Hockel, in breaking ground days before graduation.  The executive committee breaks ground at graduation. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School The executive committee breaks ground at graduation. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School Local Coloradans have been waiting decades for a Catholic high school in the Fort Collins area, miles away from any Catholic high school. Forty-nine years before St. John Paul II opened its doors in Windsor, Colorado, on Aug. 17, 2020, local Catholics sent a letter to the archdiocese requesting a Catholic high school.  As the closest Catholic high school in a 45-mile radius, St. John Paul II draws students from a 60-mile radius, even bringing students in from Cheyenne, Wyoming. “For many Catholic families in the area, including my own and my wife’s, when our families came into northern Colorado, they were hearing whispers and rumblings about a Catholic high school opening up,” Hockel told CNA in a phone call.  Now, some 53 years later, the long-awaited school will have its own building, grounds, and even a chapel.  “When we started this process, we very intentionally wanted to build something that was beautiful, that would lead to families, to students, to the people of northern Colorado seeing it as the heart of the Church in northern Colorado,” Hockel said.  Edward Mulholland, a professor at Benedictine College, was the commencement speaker for the St. John Paul II High School graduation. Mulholland directs the Great Books program at Benedictine. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School Edward Mulholland, a professor at Benedictine College, was the commencement speaker for the St. John Paul II High School graduation. Mulholland directs the Great Books program at Benedictine. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School The model plan shows landmark paintings such as “The Creation of Adam” by Michelangelo, while the chapel features an altar rail, elegant altar, and accents of blue paint on the vaulted ceiling and walls.  “When you walk into a space where you’re supposed to be pursuing the good, and it is a bland beige, it’s really hard to aspire,” Hockel continued. “It’s hard for teachers to inspire. It’s hard for students to aspire towards greater things. So we’re trying to design this building not like so many of the other things that have been slapped up over the last couple of decades.”  Averi Ulibarri, valedictorian of the senior class, gives a speech at graduation. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School Averi Ulibarri, valedictorian of the senior class, gives a speech at graduation. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School The new building is set to be completed in time for the 2025-2026 academic year. Hockel said the school has received an “unprecedented” amount of support in the most necessary area — more than $25 million in funds for the school. “At the beginning of the process, we were working with a major consulting firm who told us that we would be able to raise a certain amount of dollars and no more,” he said. “And we tripled the number of dollars that we raised within four months of going out, masking the community for support.” “The experts have been at a loss to explain why this is going as well as it is,” Hockel continued. “But the answer is pretty simple. It’s a combination of a desire of the people for the good for their community and the will of God, and nothing short of it.” The school began with 26 students in 2020 and has nearly doubled in size; Hockel anticipates more growth. “As we’ve closed on our land here … we’re going to be building our first phase of the school with the anticipation of growing to 180 students in the next two years, and then growing up to 250 while we’re in our Phase 1 plan,” he explained. “Then as we look to our next two phases across the next 10 to 20 years, we’ll look to increase that number to a population of about 400 to 450 students and maxing out at, within the next 30 years, a 600-person campus.” St. John Paul II offers “a four-year program steeped in traditional classical education” that emphasizes “a holistic education,” Hockel noted.  The classical education model at St. John Paul II emphasizes primary sources, the early Church Fathers, as well as a “very robust” math and science program. Father Gregg Pederson and Father Crispan Kibambe celebrated the baccalaureate Mass in a tent on the new grounds of St. John Paul II High School. Pearson is pastor of Our Lady of the Valley Parish, which hosted the school for four years. Kibambe is the parochial vicar at St. Mary Parish. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School Father Gregg Pederson and Father Crispan Kibambe celebrated the baccalaureate Mass in a tent on the new grounds of St. John Paul II High School. Pearson is pastor of Our Lady of the Valley Parish, which hosted the school for four years. Kibambe is the parochial vicar at St. Mary Parish. Credit: Monica Yee/St. John Paul II High School “The students read primary sources, they read Church Fathers,” Hockel said. “They go through a very robust math and science program so that they can get up into modern calculus and into modern physics, with the anticipation that by the time they graduate from our school, they’re prepared to be well-formed young men and women if they choose to pursue college or if they choose to pursue trade, that regardless, they are well-formed citizens.” “We’re built on the principle that we should give to the children a holistic education, which is built around their mind, around their body, around their communal development, around their spiritual development, so that ultimately they can fulfill that call of the Great Commission and go out and make disciples of all nations,” he added.
>> Read more

‘Equal Rights Amendment’ that could have expanded abortion fails in Minnesota (Tue, 21 May 2024)
The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis in early May urged Catholics to join a rally to oppose the “Equal Rights Amendment” (ERA) at the state capitol in St. Paul. The proposal “fails to protect Minnesotans from discrimination based on religion, could constitutionally mandate legal abortion up to the moment of birth, and promotes harmful gender ideology,” the archdiocese said. / Credit: Shutterstock CNA Staff, May 21, 2024 / 17:00 pm (CNA). A controversial proposed constitutional amendment in Minnesota, which the state’s Catholic bishops had opposed due to concerns it would expand abortion access, failed to advance this week amid partisan deadlock. The proposed amendment, sponsored by St. Paul Rep. Kaohly Her of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL), would have added several protected categories to the state’s constitution, in part saying the state cannot discriminate against a person on the basis of sex. Within the category of sex, the proposal included “making and effectuating decisions about all matters relating to one’s own pregnancy​ or decision whether to become or remain pregnant,” as well as “gender identity or gender expression” and “sexual orientation.” The Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis had in early May urged Catholics to join a rally to oppose the “Equal Rights Amendment” (ERA), saying the proposal “fails to protect Minnesotans from discrimination based on religion, could constitutionally mandate legal abortion up to the moment of birth, and promotes harmful gender ideology.” The ERA in Minnesota failed on Sunday evening after time ran out for the Democratic-controlled Senate to vote on it before the end of the legislative year, leaving the measure tabled. The amendment is dead for now until January 2025 unless a special session is called. Democratic Gov. Tim Walz said Monday he will not call a special session to try again to pass the ERA, the AP reported. The proposed amendment, if the Senate had passed it, would have been submitted to the people at the 2026 general election. If ratified by a simple majority, the amendment would have taken effect Jan. 1, 2027.  Bishop Robert Barron of Winona-Rochester, speaking in a May 6 video message on behalf of the state’s bishops, warned that the proposal constitutes “an imposition of the sexual revolution on the people of our state.” The so-called right to abortion, which the Church has always opposed, would become enshrined in Minnesota’s constitution, making it “so fundamental that we can’t even legislate against it,” Barron said. In addition, he noted that the proposal lacks the possibility of conscientious objection, meaning churches, schools, and health care institutions guided by faith could be mandated to endorse practices or speech that violate their beliefs.  At the May 8 rally at the Minnesota State Capitol, Bishop Joseph Williams, then an auxiliary of St. Paul and Minneapolis, spoke against the proposal and said moments like this show that what “unites us as people of faith is much greater than what divides us.” Williams was named coadjutor bishop of Camden, New Jersey, by Pope Francis on May 21.  From a statutory perspective, abortion is already legal up to birth in Minnesota following the 2023 passage of the Protect Reproductive Options (PRO) Act, which enshrined a constitutional right to “reproductive freedom,” ensuring the right to abortion in Minnesota up to birth for any reason as well as the right to contraception and sterilization.
>> Read more

Pope Francis on female deacons: ‘No’ (Tue, 21 May 2024)
Pope Francis sits down for an interview with Norah O'Donnell on CBS' "60 Minutes," which aired Monday, May 20, 2024. / Credit: CBS News/Adam Verdugo CNA Staff, May 21, 2024 / 11:26 am (CNA). Pope Francis has once again come out strongly against an ordained female diaconate, reiterating what for the Holy Father has been a consistently firm stance against women becoming clergy.  The pope made the remarks this week in an interview with CBS News anchor Norah O’Donnell during an appearance on the network’s flagship magazine program, “60 Minutes.” “You will have many young boys and girls that will come here at the end of next month for World Children’s Day,” O’Donnell said to the pope at one point during the interview. “And I’m curious, for a little girl growing up Catholic today, will she ever have the opportunity to be a deacon and participate as a clergy member in the Church?” “No,” the pope replied.  Pressed by O’Donnell as to whether a female diaconate was “something you’re open to,” Francis replied: “If it is deacons with holy orders, no.”  “But women have always had, I would say, the function of deaconesses without being deacons, right?” he said. “Women are of great service as women, not as ministers, as ministers in this regard, within the holy orders.” The Holy Father in the interview stressed the importance of women’s roles in the Catholic Church, describing them as “the ones who move changes forward, all sorts of changes.”  “They are braver than the men. They know how best to protect life,” the pope said. “Women are masterful custodians of life. Women are great. They are very great. And making space in the Church for women does not mean giving them a ministry, no. The Church is a mother, and women in the Church are the ones who help foster that motherliness.”  “Don’t forget that the ones who never abandoned Jesus were the women,” he pointed out. “The men all fled.” Francis last year reaffirmed the impossibility of women becoming priests, or even modern Church deacons, stating that “holy orders is reserved for men.” The pope in his discussion with O’Donnell — his first in-depth interview with a U.S. broadcast network — touched on a wide variety of subjects, from immigration to war to antisemitism. Here are some other highlights from the Holy Father’s remarks during the interview, which aired in full on Monday evening:  On immigrants fleeing violent countries for safer nations: “The solution is migration, to open the doors to migration. For an immigration policy to be good, it must have four things: for the migrant to be received, assisted, promoted, and integrated. This is what is most important, to integrate them into the new life.” On washing the feet of female prisoners at a women’s prison in Rome on Holy Thursday:  “It is true, this time it was only women because it was a women’s jail. And the message is that men and women, we are all children of God. That men and women we are all apostles and we all can lead. Let us not forget that the bravest apostles, the most courageous, were the women: Mary Magdalene, Mary Salomé, and Mary of Santiago. They stayed with Jesus to the very end.” On climate change:  “Unfortunately, we have gotten to a point of no return. It’s sad, but that’s what it is. Global warming is a serious problem. Climate change at this moment is a road to death. A road to death, eh? And it is an artificial climate change, no? Something provoked, not the normal climate change, right? … “In great measure, [wealthy countries are to blame], because they are the ones that have more of an economy and an energy based on fossil fuels that are creating this situation, right? They are the countries that can make the most difference, given their industry and all, aren’t they? But it is very difficult to create an awareness of this. They hold a conference, everybody is in agreement, they all sign, and then bye-bye. But we have to be very clear, global warming is alarming.” On his plans for retirement: “It has never occurred to me. Maybe if the day comes when my health can go no further. Perhaps because the only infirmity I have is in my knee, and that is getting much better. But it never occurred to me.”
>> Read more

Pope Francis names Bishop Joseph Williams as coadjutor bishop of Camden, New Jersey (Tue, 21 May 2024)
Bishop-elect Joseph A. Williams. / Credit: Courtesy of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis Rome Newsroom, May 21, 2024 / 09:06 am (CNA). Pope Francis on Tuesday named Bishop Joseph Williams as coadjutor bishop of Camden, New Jersey. Williams, 50, has served as an auxiliary bishop for the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis since 2022. As coadjutor, Williams will assist 79-year-old Bishop Dennis Sullivan in the administration of the Camden Diocese and will automatically succeed him as bishop upon Sullivan’s retirement next year.  “I am overjoyed in coming to a diocese whose bishop is held in such high esteem by both the faithful and the Holy Father,” Williams said after the announcement was made public. “I look forward to learning from Bishop Sullivan, my brother priests in Camden, the deacons, consecrated women and men, and the faithful of South Jersey about their needs and their hopes for the future.” According to the Diocese of Camden, Sullivan submitted his letter of resignation to the pope on his 75th birthday in 2020. Pope Francis recently notified the bishop that his resignation will be accepted on his 80th birthday on March 17, 2025. “I am also humbled that the Holy Father is allowing me the opportunity to complete my time as the bishop of Camden working alongside my successor,” said Sullivan, who has led the Camden Diocese for more than a decade. “I am immensely thankful to Pope Francis for his decision to appoint to the Diocese of Camden a bishop with so much experience as a pastor, and one so familiar with Latino culture,” he said. Williams was born in Minneapolis on May 2, 1974, as the third of nine children. He studied at the University of Minnesota-Morris and at Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio, where he discerned a vocation to the priesthood. He began his priestly training at the Saint Paul Seminary in Minnesota in 1998, earning a master’s of divinity degree. He was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis at the age of 28 on May 28, 2002, by Archbishop Harry J. Flynn. His brother, Father Peter Williams, was also ordained a priest in the archdiocese in 2004.  Williams took on an active role in ministry to Latino and Spanish-speaking Catholics while serving at the Cathedral of Saint Paul and the Divine Mercy Parish in Faribault. He then went on to serve the parishes of St. Mathias in Hampton and St. Mary in New Trier. He was appointed pastor of St. Stephen in 2008, taking on responsibility for Holy Rosary Parish in 2020. He was named episcopal vicar for Hispanic ministry in 2018.  Williams was ordained a bishop on Jan. 25, 2022, the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul. He chose “Misericordiam Volo” as his episcopal motto, meaning “I desire mercy” (Mt 9:13). The Diocese of Camden serves more than 486,000 Catholics across 62 parishes in South Jersey.  Sullivan will retain full responsibility for the diocese until March 17, 2025, when Williams will automatically succeed him.
>> Read more

VIDEO: A look at the beginning of the four National Eucharistic Pilgrimage routes (Mon, 20 May 2024)
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone processes over the Golden Gate Bridge with the Eucharist on May 19, 2024. / Credit: Jeffrey Bruno CNA Staff, May 20, 2024 / 19:30 pm (CNA). This past weekend saw the launch of the four legs of the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage, an unprecedented effort to walk with the Eucharist thousands of miles across the United States as a public witness to the Church’s teaching that the Eucharist is truly the body of Jesus Christ.  Catholics on four edges of the country — San Francisco, southern Texas, northern Minnesota, and Connecticut — took part in the celebrations to accompany the Eucharist as well as two dozen young pilgrims on their two-month journeys, which will culminate at the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis July 17–21. The National Eucharistic Pilgrimage is accompanying Jesus from city to city, lighting hearts on fire along the way. Credit: EWTN News Nightly/Screenshot The National Eucharistic Pilgrimage is accompanying Jesus from city to city, lighting hearts on fire along the way. Credit: EWTN News Nightly/Screenshot From the North — The Marian Route On Pentecost Sunday, an outdoor Mass at Itasca State Park in northern Minnesota brought a large crowd of some 2,000 people to celebrate their love for the Eucharist. Bishop Andrew Cozzens blessed the Marian Route pilgrims at the headwaters of the Mississippi River as they began their journey thousands of miles to the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis.  Bishop Andrew Cozzens of Crookston, Minnesota, blesses the crowd with the Eucharist in a monstrance during an outdoor Pentecost Sunday Mass on May 19, 2024, in Bemidji, Minnesota. The Mass at the headwaters of the Mississippi River marked the start of the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage, a four-route trek consisting of Eucharistic processions, community service and other events that culminates in July at the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianpolis, Indiana. Credit: Gianna Bonello/CNA Bishop Andrew Cozzens of Crookston, Minnesota, blesses the crowd with the Eucharist in a monstrance during an outdoor Pentecost Sunday Mass on May 19, 2024, in Bemidji, Minnesota. The Mass at the headwaters of the Mississippi River marked the start of the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage, a four-route trek consisting of Eucharistic processions, community service and other events that culminates in July at the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianpolis, Indiana. Credit: Gianna Bonello/CNA From the West — The Junipero Serra Route The longest and arguably the most challenging of the four routes, the Junipero Serra Route, began in San Francisco. Following Pentecost Mass at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption celebrated by Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, the faithful processed with the Eucharist over the Golden Gate Bridge’s iconic 1.7-mile span. The pilgrimage winds its way through the streets of San Francisco. Credit: Jeffrey Bruno The pilgrimage winds its way through the streets of San Francisco. Credit: Jeffrey Bruno From the South — The Juan Diego Route In the Diocese of Brownsville, Texas, Bishop Daniel Flores celebrated Mass at Immaculate Conception Cathedral before pilgrims started on their journey amid 90-degree heat. The Juan Diego Route attracted many participants and has already included numerous stops for Eucharistic adoration in Brownsville, with the next major stop being Corpus Christi, the city named after the body of Christ.  The Juan Diego Route began in Texas, winding its way through the Rio Grande Valley. Credit: EWTN News Nightly/Screenshot The Juan Diego Route began in Texas, winding its way through the Rio Grande Valley. Credit: EWTN News Nightly/Screenshot From the East — The Seton Route The faithful began in New Haven, Connecticut, with a Pentecost Vigil Mass celebrated by Archbishop Christopher Coyne at St. Mary’s Church, the resting place of Blessed Michael McGivney, the founder of the Knights of Columbus. On Sunday morning, the procession culminated in a boat ride across the Long Island Sound, with chaplain Father Roger Landry keeping the Eucharist secure within the monstrance.  View the entire roundup below from the EWTN News team.
>> Read more

Council Information

Contact Us

Knights of Columbus

Council 13808

 

6341 Lake Oconee Parkway

Greensboro GA 30642

 

Grand Knight

Mike Dutton

Telephone : 

(309) 397-8924

 

Use our contact form.

Google Search our site

Loading
Print | Sitemap
© Knights of Columbus Council 13808